Dortmund Concert Milk

Dortmund Concert Milk

We let cows listen to selected artists from the new season. The classical music had a positive effect on their milk, which we bottled right on the farm. Thus we created not only a range of nine different flavours, but a new medium: milk.
Sales and tastings at shops and in the Concert Hall gave people who hardly encounter classical music the chance to taste the new season and experience music like never before. The media reported widely. Subscriptions rose by 19%.

Aural Achitecture/ Visualise Sound

Aural Achitecture/ Visualise Sound

In this interactive installation site several trays carrying water and mount loudspeaker underneath, using contact microphones to collect the internal sound of building structures and amplify it with speakers synchronously. It reflects people’s actions and footsteps, and visualises the motion, every sound frequency in the space could affect the water patterns, and people could perceive noises from themselves and the place, observe the change of surrounded noises immediately. Installed the Piezo contact microphone on architecture structure including ground, window and railings. And each sound sources correspond three different speakers, producing diverse water water patterns, using projector to project the light and producing the reflection on wall and fabric. People can step, touch, hear and observe.

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Black Noise White Silence

Zwarte Ruis Witte Stilte (Black Noise White Silence) is a compact, computer-generated audiovisual work which makes use of minimal resources to demonstrate the impact possible with digital media. The tight synchronization of video and audio is the dominant source of tension in this piece – the visual activity is mapped explicitly pixel-per-pixel to the audio track, resulting in an intense multi-sensoral experience for the viewer. It was inspired by the experimental video works of computer graphics pioneers such as Lillian Schwartz and John Whitney. The use of fractal-generated source material gives this work an organic quality, while its compact form provides a sense of immediacy and contiguity.

Pascal Broccolichi: Sound Installations

Pascal Broccolichi: Sound Installations

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French sound and visual artist Pascal Broccolichi creates installations that envision sound as a vocabulary of forms, but whose focus is on listening. In his piece Raccorama (top four photos) Broccolichi takes mica dust and places it in identical heaps, following a specific pattern which is then emphasized by iodide spotlights. Loudspeakers play a sound piece simulating the patterns of sound flux in motion. In a more recent work, and variation on the Raccorama theme, Broccolichi creates similar mica dust heaps, this time placing a loudspeaker in the center of each creating a crater. This installation titled Table d’harmonie (bottom photo), also plays a sound piece simulating sound flux in motion.

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Kinetic String Sculpture Visualizes Sound

Kinetic String Sculpture Visualizes Sound

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We can hear sound but how does one visually represent it? Artist Daniel Palacios takes a go at visualizing noise with his kinetic sculpture called Waves that consists of a long, sturdy string of rope attached to a turbine on each end. The interactive structure responds to movement in both a visual and an audible manner. The number of people that are present within the same room and their level of activity and motion directly affects the vigor with which the motors spin. An increase in population and motion results in increasing speeds of the turbines which causes the rope to form different visible shapes. The escalating speed of the twirling rope also prompts a thunderous whirring noise that is hard to miss. Check out the video, below, to get an idea of the different shapes formed and sounds emitted by the structure. Waves is part of an international group exhibition called Visualizing Sound currently showing at LABoral Art and Industrial Creation Centre through June 25, 2012.

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