THE ARK

A site specific installation by Romain Tardy and Squeaky Lobster
Proyecta Oaxaca, Ethnobotanical garden of Oaxaca, Mexico

Concept & Visual design by Romain Tardy
Music composed by Squeaky Lobster
Project management & production by Nicolas Boritch

The Ark is a site specific installation, commissioned by and presented during Proyecta Oaxaca, festival de diseño y artes digitales. The Ark is built around the cacti that line the Aljibe, at the heart of the Ethnobotanical Garden of Oaxaca. Adopting a poetic approach, The Ark gives voice to the garden’s plants, participants in the work, the beating heart of the space and an unpredictable choir. Telling their story, revealing their fantasised and fantastical character, The Ark is the mise-en-abîme of the trail. A three part audio-visual installation, it unfolds like a movie set in space, in which the wandering spectator plays the role of the camera.

More info at antivj.com

Proyecta Oaxaca
On the invitation of Proyecta Oaxaca, several artists from the ANTIVJ visual label have devised four visual and sonic works to be installed at the heart of the Ethnobotanical Garden in Oaxaca. Conceived of as a trail of light, these in-situ works offered the chance to (re)discover a singular and magical location in a particularly unique way – by opening the garden to the public at night. A trail of the senses, in several variations, it also presents spectators the perspective of four artists on this atypical space, in which ancient nature and new technology come face to face, like a distant echo of the ancestral techniques that have allowed for its conservation. The trail consisted of the following four works:

Onion Skin, by Olivier Ratsi & Thomas Vaquié
The Ark, by Romain Tardy & Squeaky Lobster
3Destruct | Oaxaca, by Yannick Jacquet, Thomas Vaquié & Jeremie Peeters
Réplica, by Laurent Delforge & Thomas Vaquié
All projects managed by Nicolas Boritch.

Proyecta Oaxaca
content director: Manuel Alcala
producer: Samuel Rivera
technical director: Azael Saenz

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Swarm Synthesizer

A visual instrument for creating and controlling organically moving particles with a swarm behaviour.

During the ‘Visual Synthesisers’ Workshop by Ludwig Zeller in February 2014, Cyrill and I took Daniel Shiffman’s ‘Flocking’ Sketch as basis for creating a visual instrument. The swarm behaviour was changed, the visual style and shape were matched to the music, a trail effect was added and mostly the code was adapted to be controllable with rotary knobs and push buttons – based on the Arduino platform with Firmata applied. The resulting live perfomance was captured on the video above.

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CONTACT

Contact is a tangible audio interface to manipulate and visualize sounds generated from interaction with a simple wooden surface.
Any physical contact with the table generates acoustic vibrations which are manipulated and visualized LIVE as they occur using several communicating pieces of software.

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ERWIN STACHE: Kilo Ohm

87,3 Kilo Ohm is a sound object from Erwin Stache based on the individual skin-resistance. Depending on way of touching the metal (more or less powerful) you control the sounds. So it is possible to play piano, drum or some other strange instruments and influence the pitch, the velocity and other parameters of the tones.
As an interactive object 87,3 Kilo Ohm can be used by public inside an outside. A smaller form is also used as instrument in concert.

Cracklebox – Steim

Michel Waisvisz designed and built the very first Crackle circuit in the late 60ties together with Geert Hamelberg. This was simply a wooden frame with some print boards mounted rear-side up to be touched by the fingers. The circuits were ‘malformed’ oscillators that were very unstable and highly sensitive for finger connections. The Crackle circuit, as well as the powered speaker box, were battery powered to avoid hum and repeated exposure to dangerous electrical shocks. In 1973 Michel Waisvisz joined STEIM and started working on more touchable electronic instruments together with Peter Beyls, Nico Bes and Johan den Biggelaar, and by the mid-seventies they had created both the ‘Crackle Synth’ and the ‘Crackle Box’.

Today STEIM still builds and sells Crackle boxes. The Magnetic Fields recently used one in their album Love at the Bottom of the Sea. Swedish percussionist Sven-Åke Johansson carries one often and uses it frequently in recordings and improvisation. Mazen Kerbaj tours with one of the original Crackle synthesizers.

You can order a Cracklebox via the STEIM online store

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SOUNDSHAPES

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As a sounddesigner and musician I always experience music as something very tangible. Almost in the same degree as experiencing a landscape. But sound always remains something ungraspable. I got fascinated by the Chladni patterns. They visualise resonance patterns of sound in a miraculous way. Salt or a similar substance is poured on a thin metal plate that is resonating on a clear tone. Every tonefrequency has it’s own specific symetrical organic drawing that appears. The device used is called a Chladni plate. During my research I built several. I made the process of transformation within the drawing on the Chladni plate threedimensional inspired by CT scan technology. A piece of sound is now spatially recorded.

Every soundbit will have it’s own characteristic scultpture. What will your favourite melody
look like? The results of this study consists of a 3d print of a soundbit of approx. 400-600hz and a handmade model of tulip wood of approx. 550-600hz.

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